Frog Eyed Gecko

Frog Eyed Gecko
Frog Eyed Gecko

Scientific Name

  • Teratoscincus scincus

General Information

  • Also known as Wonder Gecko.
  • The gecko is a nocturnal.
  • Frog eyed gecko lives mainly in the darkest hours of the night.
  • The gecko keyserlingi are also active during the day and twilight.
  • Males are intolerant toward each other.
  • In nature they make holes about 80 cm (32 inches) deep (into the humid underground).
  • The animals are adapted to very extreme circumstances. Through their delicate skin, they are able to take up oxygen directly from the air.
  • Summer temperatures should be between 25 and 30 degrees Celsius.
  • In winter a decrease of 10 degrees Celsius can be initiated.
  • Changes of season are important for breeding.

Distribution

  • Desert and arid habitats of southern Asia
  • For examples: eastern Arabia, north to Kazakhstan, Iran, Afghanistan, and western China

Breeding

  • Breeding is not easy. Mating takes place at the beginning of the year, when ambient temperatures are rising.
  • Extra calcium for the females is very important in this period.

Nesting

  • Females produce about four clutches a year, each consisting of two eggs (calcified)
  • Produce clutches of 2 eggs, hard shelled but fragile.
  • Relatively low humidity – 40-55% required. Since higher temperature can kill embryo.
  • Incubation temperature: 80-90ºF (25-30ºC).
  • The eggs hatch in 70-100 days.

Size

  • 4.5 to 6.25 inches (11.4-15.9 cm)

Life Span

  • 15+ years

Diet and Feeding

  • Mealworms and beetles, giant mealworms, crickets, non-toxic beetles, other lizards and/or own hatchlings.

Habitat

  • These lizards like plenty of hiding places supply imitation plants, rocks, bark hides.
  • Sand act as a substrat and make it fairly deep.
  • Keep the sand in one half of the vivarium semi moist, below the surface only.

Common Disease

Other Gecko Information

  • Gecko is getting more and more popular in pet communities
  • Love your pets, take good care of your lizard!

Blue Tongue Skink

Blue Tongue Skink
Blue Tongue Skink

Scientific Name

  • The scientific name of Blue Tongue Skink is Tiligua Scincoides

Description

  • This is a large lizard with long body, large head and small legs with delicate toes.
  • The tail is shorter than the body and generally tapers to a point.
  • Colour consists of a pattern of dark brown bars on a light brown or cream background; orange bars alternate with brown on the sides.
  • They have faint eye stripes and a cobalt-blue tongue.
  • Scales are shiny, overlapping, and contain small plates of bone.
  • Eardrums are sunken into cavities on sides of head.
  • Skin is shed in pieces.
  • They can shed its tail to escape predators and has a moveable and transparent lower eyelid to protect its eyes from dust and still see.
  • They might ingests small stones to help digest its food.

Distribution

  • They are found in Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea.

Breeding

  • Northern blue tongues are among the easiest and most predictable breeder of the common blue tongues.
  • Unfortunately there is no reliable method to sex juveniles.
  • If your goal is to breed, you must either purchase proven adults or raise up juveniles until they can be sexed.
  • One reliable method of sexing adults is to house each blue tongue separately in a container void of substrate, the males will regularly shed small clear seminal plugs.

Nesting

  • Does not lay eggs, but give birth to live young lizards.
  • A female will only produce around 5-15 young lizards a year.

Size

  • Adult: 17 to 24 inches.

Life Span

  • 18 to 20 years.

Food and Feeding

  • These lizards are omnivorous, eating a variety of insects, snails, carrion, flowers and fruits.
  • The reptiles are not very agile and the animals they eat are mostly slow moving.
  • Their teeth are large and they have strong jaw muscles so they can crush snails and beetles.

Where Do Blue Tongue Skinks Live?

  • They live principally in open country with lots of ground cover such as tussocky grasses or leaf litter.
  • The Northern Blue Tongue lives in tropical/savannah woodland in the northern part of West Australia.

Green Iguana

Green Iguana
Green Iguana

Scientific Name

  • The scientific name of Green Iguana is Iguana iguana

Description

  • Iguanas are certainly one of the most popular lizards to be kept as pets (probably one of the world’s most popular pet reptiles).
  • Easy to keep as long as large area is provided.
  • Iguanas are one of the more recent “fad” pets, becoming readily available in many pet stores, often at very low prices.
  • These are young iguanas that don’t seem to be too difficult to care for, a myth often perpetuated by retailers hoping to sell them. Of course, they are very cute too!
  • Similar as other reptiles, iguanas have fairly strict feeding and housing requirements.
  • When they grow up, they are often very large in size (if they survive) and they can be difficult to tame and always become aggressive.
  • This is not to say that iguanas cannot make good pets – but they need the proper care right from the start, and owners need to have the right expectations.

Distribution

  • They are found from Central to South America, including Brazil, Mexico to Paraguay.

Size

  • Male: approx. 6′ (SVL 1′ 8″).
  • Female: approx. 4′ (SVL 1′ 2″).
  • These iguana are weighted around 15 – 30 lbs.

Life Span

  • They live up to 15 – 20 years

Green Iguana Food and Feeding

  • The iguanas are herbivorous, meaning that they are purely plant-eating animals.
  • Hatchlings and young iguana may eat worms and insects.
  • Adults should be only fed with greens.

Natural Habitat and Housing

  • Rainforests, usually where near to river banks.
  • A large water bowl should be provided for soaking, not for drinking as Green iguana would never drink by its mouth.
  • It would absorb enough water from the environment and water spray.

Green Iguana Common Disease

  • It has been found that many reptiles carry Salmonella, meaning it is present in the digestive tract without causing disease.
  • You need to follow common hygiene practices when handling iguanas to prevent unforeseen problems.
  • If there are young children, pregnant women, immunocompromised people or elderly persons are to contact with the iguana, extra care will have to be taken to prevent Salmonella infections.

Veiled Chameleon

Veiled Chameleon
Veiled Chameleon

Scientific Name

  • The scientific name of Veiled Chameleon is Chamaelo calyptratus

Description

  • Veiled Chameleon is one of the best and most popular pet chameleons in the world.
  • It is a gorgeous creature and great beginner chameleon.

Distribution

  • Veiled Chameleons are found in Yemen and Saudi Arabia.

Breeding

  • The mating age is from 5 – 6 months.

Size

  • Adults 14 – 20 inches for male, from 10 – 14 inches for female.
  • Veiled Chameleons reach adult size in 1 year.

Lifespan

  • Up to 10 years.

Veiled Chameleon Food and Feeding

  • Various insects and worms.
  • Please note that removal of all the remaining insects is essential as they (specially crickets) will harass the chameleon at night, resulting stress to the chameleon.
  • Occasionally feed them with green leaves

Habitat

  • Arboreal, Solitary; Mountainous desert areas.
  • A large water bowl should be placed for drinking and for humidity-control.
  • It’s a best practice to put a pump inside the cage to make the water flowing as Veiled Chameleons usually cannot recognise still water.

Leopard Gecko

Leopard Gecko
Leopard Gecko

Scientific Name

  • The scientific name of Leopard Gecko is Eublepharis macularius

Description

  • Leopard geckos are among the largest geckos.
  • Most leopard geckos have a yellow background with brown spots covering the adults.
  • Juvenile geckos have a predominantly striped pattern that fades to the spotted pattern with age.
  • They also have a very obvious outer ear and differ from many geckos in that they have eyelids and lack adhesive lamellae, meaning they can’t walk up vertical services.

Distribution

  • Leopard geckos are found in Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and India.

Breeding

  • Leopard geckos are relatively easy to breed.
  • One male will mate with several females so people tend to keep them in groups of one male to 3 or 4 females.
  • Pregnant females can usually be detected because of a bump on each side of her abdomen.
  • If provided with a laying box females will tend to use it. Something like a cool whip tub with a hole cut in the side that is filled with moist moss or vermiculite will provide an attractive place for the females.
  • Females will usually produce multiple clutches of eggs during breeding season.
  • The eggs should be removed from the egg laying box and incubated in vermiculite with a 1:1 ratio of water to vermiculite by weight.
  • The plastic shoebox inside of a ten gallon aquarium makes an adequate incubator. If incubated at 85°F they should hatch in around 2 months.
  • A higher incubation temperature will produce more females.
  • The newborn geckos will not eat until after their first shed (usually after about a week).
  • They can then be started on appropriately sized insects. It’s also best to house them separate, such as in plastic shoeboxes.
  • Breeding normally begins around spring time when the air temperatures and day length increase.
  • Seasons vary in start time and length from season to season depending on temperature levels, however, breeding normally commences anywhere from January to March and can carry on until September.
  • Male gecko are very persistent and will continually pester the female, this can obviously stress the female and be detrimental to her health, or could lead to the male or female being injured.
  • If you decide to keep your male and female(s) together, you should be very vigilant for problems (such as bullying, stress, injuries etc).
  • In addition, if you are keeping a breeding group, you should also be aware that some of the females may not tolerate each other.
  • Another alternative is to keep your male and female(s) separate all year round, only introducing them for mating during the breeding season- this method has many advantages (you can be sure when they mated.
  • Monitor each of the geckos more closely and you also lessen the risk of injury/bullying).
  • The female only needs to mate once to produce fertile eggs all season (they can store the sperm).

Size

  • Adults 8 – 9 inches

Life Span

  • 10-15 years

Leopard Gecko Food and Feeding

  • Leopard geckos are relatively easy to feed because they will thrive on insects. A staple of crickets along with occasional waxworms and mealworms make a good diet.
  • Adult geckos can also be fed an occasional pinkie mouse.
  • Juveniles can be feed every day and adults every other day.
  • Supplementation is a must for leopard geckos. Two supplements should be used: one that is just calcium/D3 and another that is a reptile multivitamin.
  • Juveniles should be supplemented at every feeding and adults at every other feeding.
  • A shallow water dish should be provided at all times and changed daily to stop bacteria and fungus growth.
  • Allowing leopard geckos access to a moist area is a good idea that aids in shedding.
  • Even though they come from arid climates that burrows tend to have moderate humidity.
  • People can supply this humidity by moistening the area under their hide boxes. Make sure that the overall cage isn’t wet or overly humid.

Leopard Gecko Habitat and Housing

  • An aquarium is a perfect home although many people have success with plastic sweater boxes.
  • Since they are a terrestrial species, a long aquarium is better than a high one.
  • Make sure that you only have one male per enclosure as males will fight each other.
  • Rocks and logs can make the terrarium more natural looking and they provide your lizards with places to climb and get exercise.
  • A hide box is also recommended for each lizard for use in times or conflict and for sleeping.

Bearded Dragon

Bearded Dragon
Bearded Dragon

Scientific Name

  • The scientific name of Bearded Dragon is Pogona Vitticeps

Description

  • Even though bearded dragon may look somewhat threatening, they are very personable lizards.
  • Bearded Dragons are hardy lizards that attain a moderate adult size and you can care for them rather easily.
  • Bearded dragons have become one of the most popular pet lizards because they make a great kids pet or first time herper pet.
  • Many things influence a dragon’s colour including stress, genes, and time of day. Many dragons seems to show there best colour when sleeping, or soaking in water

Distribution

  • Australia

Breeding

  • Breeding often requires a period of hibernation or brumation prior to the breeding season (see section on hibernation).
  • When bearded dragons emerge from hibernation, breeding usually takes place quickly, so it is important to be prepared.
  • We suggest that your dragons (specifically females) be at least 18 months-old prior to breeding.
  • Any small, sick, or young females should be separated from all males to prevent cycling, breeding, and potentially a loss of life.
  • Dragons that are bred before mature can wind up with serious health problems including death from egg binding.
  • We cannot stress enough how important it is to have a healthy, mature female.
  • Dragons bred before maturity will divert energy used for growing and maturity into making eggs, disrupting her growth process and altering her health.
  • Female dragons bred at very young age often will live shorter lives.
  • We also highly suggest steering clear of inbreeding, especially siblings.
  • Breeding behaviour often appears violent. Head bobbing and black beards are among the breeding behaviours associated with males (*note: these behaviours are also typical of territorial disputes between males). Females often perform arm waving and slow head bobbing. The male usually bites the female around the neck to secure her and attempts to get the female to lift her tail for copulation.
  • Gravid females will get quite large and often appear lumpy. Feed gravid females often and supplement with calcium more frequently. The eggs can often be felt in the female’s stomach when she is close to laying.
  • As soon as you see breeding behaviour it is a good idea to have a lay area in place and an incubator prepared.
  • A good lay area is imperative to ensure that your bearded dragon does not egg bind. Lay areas may consist of a large area filled with one foot of a mixture of moist, somewhat packed sand and soil, peat moss, or bed-a-beast.
  • You may set up this lay area inside the enclosure or prepare a separate lay enclosure to place the female in when you notice digging behaviour.
  • Females will tunnel into this area to deposit their eggs. Some dig for several days before they decide to lay.
  • They like to be fully protected by their burrow (cat litter pans with an opening work well for this cave-like structure). Only her head will stick out while she deposit their eggs.
  • After laying, the female will emerge and bury her eggs back up.
  • Females may lay clutches as often as 3 weeks apart and can retain sperm for several clutches.

Incubation

  • Unearth the eggs GENTLY.
  • Fertile eggs should be a nice white color and leathery in texture. If candled, fertile eggs will appear pink and a round embryo should be detectable.
  • If the eggs appear yellow when candled or gelatinous, they are probably infertile (this is somewhat common for a first clutch of eggs).
  • Fertile eggs should be placed in a dish with moist vermiculite (and perlite if you wish) about one inch apart.
  • This dish is then transferred to your pre-calibrated incubator. We suggest a “Hovabator” incubator. (You can find these at some pet stores, feed stores, and online).
  • Make sure that your incubator is set at least 24 hours prior to use to avoid drastic fluctuations in temperature.
  • We recommend incubating at around 84°F. Do not let temperature range out of the 80s.
  • Spray egg containers to maintain moisture level in the vermiculite.
  • Eggs should hatch about 60 days after incubation.

Hatchling and Baby Bearded Dragon Care

  • Only house hatchlings of similar size together.
  • Quarantine all new animals from different sources, especially with the new information on adenovirus in hatchlings
  • Make sure to supplement every day with calcium and vitamins.
  • Small dragons can stress easily, especially when acclimating to a new environment.
  • Vitamin B is a great stress combatant and helps the acclimation process. If your young dragon still seems stressed, administer vitamin b drops such as “stimulap”, but try to leave them alone as much as possible.
  • We recommend a 1.3 ratio of vitamins to calcium offered once daily to babies. See the supplementation section of the care sheet for more info.
  • House hatchlings in an enclosure that they cannot see out of to limit stress.
  • House hatchlings on paper towels or newspaper to prevent problems with impaction.
  • Spray hatchlings 2 times daily.
  • Feed babies 2-4 times per day. Steer clear of mealworms, they can be hard for young dragons to digest. Stick to small crickets and finely chopped greens.
  • We know that these little guys are cute, but when first adjusting to a new home (the first couple days), handle these babies minimally.
  • Because food sources are likely carriers of parasites, we recommend using Parazap as a preventative.
  • We suggest only using medication as a last resort for babies.

Size

  • Adult 15 to 24 inches in length.
  • Hatchlings 3 to 4 inches at birth.

Life Span

  • 6-12 years, maybe longer.
  • Young dragons grow fast and are sexually mature by one year of age. Juvenile bearded dragons usually start showing their coloration by two months of age.

Bearded Dragon Diet and Food Feeding

  • Bearded dragons are omnivorous and should feed on both vegetation and protein. Crickets, mealworms, superworms, and a salad mixture should be staple food sources.
  • Dragons require a variety of greens including collard greens, red leaf lettuce, green leaf lettuce, mustard greens, turnip greens, and dandelion greens.
  • Stay away from iceberg lettuce, large amounts of kale, cabbage, or spinach.
  • We also suggest a variety of vegetables such as carrots, squash, sweet potatoes, peas, corn, and fruits offered in small amounts.
  • Other specialty additions can include cactus fruit, dandelion flowers, and hibiscus flowers. This salad mix can be offered daily using different combinations of ingredients.
  • Never feed your dragon too large of a prey item. We suggest feeding prey 1/2 to 3/4 the size of the space between your dragons eyes.
  • When feeding crickets, make sure your source of crickets is clean. You may gutload your crickets with commercial cricket and/or we suggest offering your crickets fresh fruit, greens, and water. Remove all old food from your cricket container. Mold can be toxic to your lizards. We suggest using a moistened paper towel/sponge, citrus, or carrots to provide water for your crickets.
  • We feed all of our hatchlings a minimum of three times a day to ensure optimum growth and health. As dragons get older, their appetite will decrease. For adult dragons, you can offer greens daily and crickets or worms 3-4 times per week. As dragons get older, you reduce the protein and increase the vegetables or fruits.

Habitat and Housing

  • Do not house bearded dragons of different sizes together–this is a sure problem for the smaller dragons’ health.
  • We recommend housing males separately.
  • You may even need to prevent males from seeing each other across cages.
  • Keep your cages and food CLEAN ! Clean and sift poop often.
  • Remove all old food.
  • Wash your hands before and after handling your lizard.
  • Be sure to sanitise hands in between handling different reptile species.
  • We suggest misting your dragons once a day, especially as hatchlings. Dragons will drink during spraying and may also be “trained” to drink and soak in a water dish inside the enclosure.
  • They also enjoy an occasional warm (not hot) bath.

Common Disease

  • Bearded dragons are one of the hardiest reptiles available in the pet trade, yet they still can succumb to numerous diseases and problems.
  • If you notice that your lizard is ill, do not hesitate to make an appointment with a reptile specialist.
  • Too little D3 and calcium can lead to metabolic bone disease.
  • Some early symptoms of this problem include the shaking, twitching, or stiffness of limbs (especially rear legs), separation of the mouth, and difficulty chewing food.
  • If this problem is caught early enough, supplementation and exposure to natural sun can be good remedies.
  • Calcium deficiency is often seen in older dragons, or under supplemented dragons. There is also the possibility of over supplementing your dragons, causing a myriad of problems all its own.
  • Parasites: There are numerous parasites that can become a problem for a bearded dragon.
  • Many dragons live with these parasites without problems, but symptoms can often be triggered by stress (such as contact with an other dragon or animal, change of enclosures, hibernation, breeding, etc.) Parasites often come from insects, greens, and/or unclean cage conditions so that it is imperative to keep proper hygiene in these areas.
  • Even fresh greens and fruit can harbor parasites, so wash them well.
  • If you feed your dragon live insects it is probable that your dragon carries some level of coccidia and maybe pinworms.
  • The idea is to keep the levels low.
  • Mites: Since all bearded dragons are captive bred, mites should not be a problem.
  • Although some pet stores keep less than sanitary conditions and mites may spread from animal to animal.
  • These are small bugs that can be seen on the dragon.
  • There are several products on the market that can take care of the problem.
  • We recommend checking with your vet before administering these products.